Oh how I'm enjoying the Peugeot e208 lol

I will just leave this here

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This needs a Homer Simpson doh meme

PSA stellantis cars in winter

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All to do with driving style and type of journey as we know. I usually manage to get a decent range out of my eC4. More than some others on the forum have mentioned. I still have the heater on etc but do often drive in ECO with that particular car.

Also, the Stellantis GOMs are woefully inaccurate.

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Getting a similar range on our e208, we are doing alot of motorway driving and we are getting between 100-105 miles of range at the moment.

Just ignore the GOM.

208 range is low, but not that low. If you don’t mind the expense, a Tronity and ABRP subscription is well worth the investment. Will let you happily ignore the GOM and get the real range out of it, down to single digit %, confidently. Live feedback to the ABRP app so you know what SoC you will arrive on.

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Basically the same here in the e208, over the holiday period I was travelling back and forwards to my partners’ parents (South Yorkshire → St Helens) which is 75 miles via motorway, I’d start with 217 miles on the GOM (100%) and arrive with ~25-35 miles, charge then when driving back I’d charge on the other end again as I’d again arrive back home with ~25-35 miles remaining, so I’d be charging twice in a day.

I do really like the e208 but if I were paying for charging I wouldn’t own one!

December I charged 495 kWh:

January, not even halfway through the month and already done 222 kWh so I’m on track for another 500 kWh month (my mileage stays pretty constant):

I’ve had the car for three months meaning I’ll have consumed around 1500 kWh, I charge at Instavolt mainly so my three-month cost would have been (40p/kWh in Nov, Dec - Jan 45p/kWh) £650 in electricity :electric_plug: thank god for all-inclusive charging!!

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Yeah that’s one thing I noticed when I had the DS3. Used to use a lot of charge. Hyundai on the other hand because its so efficient, I used to use about 60 to 70 pounds of electricity to use almost 800 odd miles. Max I did was about 140 pounds last month for a 1700 mile trip and that was because we used alot of ionity chargers for big top ups like 15% to 75%.

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I agree with all the comments. I love my e208 which I have now had for 3 months. It is a second car which I use to get to the office 45 miles away. For 24 of these I need to travel down the M40. I charge each evening to full as otherwise I would be struggling to make the daily round trip. In the morning I will probably get to the office with around 100 mile range left. Today it was down to 80 and by the time I got home…20 miles, which to be honest is a first but still slightly concerning. If it wasn’t for Onto’s free charging facilities then however much I love driving an EV and the e208 in particular, it wouldn’t be economically viable if I had to pay to charge

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Oof and another ooof for the minimum character count.

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E2008 just as bad, :rofl:

…but then I drive in sports mode with heater on - performance and comfort and don’t need the range.

I thought lack of range was the reason for onto not getting i3 / mini electric / honda e …

ONTO can only make range based decisions on published data. Here are the figures given on the EV Database website. These are “real world” ranges:

e-208……………125 to 265 miles
Honda e…………70 to 155 miles
Mini Electric….80 to 175 miles

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265 mile’s with an e-208 that’s not very real world is it, that car would never do that on a 60o summer day traveling nothing but downhill for all the mileage :joy::joy:

Only 1 car as bad as the e-208 in the cars I’ve had and that’s the current car I’ve got, the e-up although considering how much I pay I can forgive it but no chance would I go back to an e-208.

The mileage is that bad currently I’m even considering going back to a Zoe I mean seriously that’s how bad it is.

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Well I did 261 miles in a 41kWh Zoe so with an extra 4kWh 265 should be more than possible in an e-208 :wink:

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Never and you know that because the battery pack size is irrelevant when it manages energy so very badly indeed.

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(As far as efficiency, I know I started at the “luxury” end of the range with the South Koreans….but….)

I don’t understand how the battery management can be so different between the different car groups

Inefficient battery heater.

The cars battery likes to be at around 15 degrees*
In summer it doesn’t need to heat the battery so you get a reasonable 180 mile range.

In winter temps of 5 degrees it has to work hard to heat that battery up to temperature, and that uses power so you end up with much less range.

All cars have to do this, but it seems PSA group have a particularly poor heating setup, or set a higher target temperature than others ? Hence poor range as soon as outside temperature is low.

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But do they? I only know that Teslas will when you get near a supercharger which is in the SatNav to stop at. I think there are a few others that warm the battery in cold conditions. Maybe someone knows which ones. AFAIK, the majority of EVs do not have a battery heater. They only warm up to the ambient temperature or through discharging and recharging.

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@mikered what is this utter witchcraft?!? and how do I get % SOC while not plugged in? Mines a e208 but surely the software is virtually the same lol

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SoC only available on e2008 not e208 at the moment.

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